Love binds together …

 

L.S. Bergman

In my new release ‘One Week’, I wanted to spotlight a theme so close to my heart … diabetes, a complex illness which is changing the face of our health in so many countries around the world.

Where ‘One Week’ is set, in the UK, there are around 700 people a day apparently diagnosed with diabetes.  And the number of young people living with diabetes, under the age of 19 is growing, with girls being twice as likely to have Type 2 diabetes as boys. (Source: Diabetes UK)

Back home on my island, the figures are equally staggering and all-pervasive. The stumbling blocks with this illness is its subtle ability to go undetected, and not taken seriously for years until it’s tentacles have reached so far the damage is either done or incredibly hard to treat or stabilize.

In ‘One Week’, Paula is a determined soul, trying to be brave enough to deal with the personal twists and turns of her own journey and those familial ties that bind …

Link: https://www.amazon.com/dp/B073S5CNG7/ref=la_B009A46QJG_1_9?s=books&ie=UTF8&qid=1499673484&sr=1-9

Monday Sample #NewRelease:

One Week

L.S. Bergman

Watching Lakshmi hop down the steps into the tube, Paula would’ve done anything to bounce home to shower and change, but she knew where she was supposed to be at. Reaching into her treasure chest of a bag, she tried to locate her phone. After some fumbling, she got it, took it out and scanned her texts, her eyes quickly falling on the one, besides Rob’s, she’d expected to be there.

It was from her dad.

You passing through today?

Paula smiled, a vision of her father in his wheelchair coming full-centre in her head.

She saw her father once a week usually. Saturday afternoons had been their mainstay for a while, but since starting the job, she’d had to cancel once already.

He hadn’t said anything untoward, but Paula could feel his disappointment. And, despite everything they’d been through together as a family, she always felt affected by him, his sadness a reminder of how far he had fallen as a man. His battle with diabetes pulled at her heart strings, as did his frequent bouts of depression.

Happy families, Paula sighed. She’d always been fascinated by the concept.

Perfect relationships.

Perfect parents with perfectly sized and polished children.

I mean, who had those?

That perfect constellation of make believe, unjustly exquisite in its un-attainability. Paula was too smart not to know it was bullshit, but it didn’t stop her longing. Longing for… perhaps things to be a little different. More cohesion and less fragmentation, unable to stop from clinging to a wobbly sunken notion of dotting the ‘I”s and crossing the ‘T”s of a perfect upper middle class life. But it wasn’t to be. Paula was no perfect egg from a perfect nest. Privileged ‘yes’, but alternatively nurtured, with a walk-in wardrobe full of wounds, nostalgic imperfections and queries about things she’d seen around her that even today she didn’t fully understand. Still, love is the stronger power no matter how many detours life serves you up. Right?

That’s what Paula told herself anyway, what she believed in, what drove her powers of forgiveness and understanding especially apropros her father.” (One Week © L.S. Bergman 2017)

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